Neil Aspinall

March 23rd 2008, Neil Aspinall, who ran the Apple Corps music empire for the Beatles from 1970 - 2007 died at a hospital in New York from cancer aged 66. A school friend of Sir Paul McCartney and George Harrison, he was regarded by some of the band as the "fifth Beatle" becoming The Beatles road manager in 1961 before becoming their personal assistant. He led the legal battle with Apple computers over the use of the Apple name and a royalties dispute between the Beatles and record label EMI. Aspinall had also played background instruments on Beatles tracks including 'Magical Mystery Tour', 'Within You Without You' and 'Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite.'


 Facebook | | |

John Fogerty

March 23rd 1985, Former Creedence Clearwater Revival front man John Fogerty went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Centerfield.'


 Facebook | | |

Damon Albarn

Happy birthday to Damon Albarn, born on 23rd March 1968, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and record producer. With Blur he scored the 1994 UK No.1 album Parklife, which spent over 2 years on the UK chart, and the 1995 UK No. 1 'Country House'. Albarn along with Jamie Hewlett formed the "virtual band" Gorillaz who had the 2001 UK No.4 single, 'Clint Eastwood.' Other projects include The Good, The Bad & The Queen, (2007 self-titled album with Paul Simonon, Tony Allen and Simon Tong). Albarn's debut solo studio album Everyday Robots was released in 2014.



 Facebook | | |

Jimmy Miller

March 23rd 1942, Born on this day, Jimmy Miller, New York-born record producer and musician. He is best known for his lengthy association with The Rolling Stones, for whom he produced a string of singles and albums during the band's career: Beggars Banquet (1968), Let It Bleed (1969), Sticky Fingers (1971), Exile On Main Street (1972) and Goats Head Soup (1973). Miller died on 22 October 1994.


 Facebook | | |

Ric Ocasek

March 23rd 1949, Born on this day, Ric Ocasek, The Cars, (1978 UK No.3 single 'My Best Friend's Girl.' 1984 US No.3 & 1985 UK No.4 'Drive' was used as part of the soundtrack for the Live Aid concert.


 Facebook | | |

The Concert For Bangladesh

23rd March 1972, The film of The Concert For Bangladesh featuring George Harrison, Bob Dylan and Eric Clapton premiered in New York. The event was the first benefit concert of this magnitude in world history. The concert raised $243,418.51 for Bangladesh relief, which was administered by UNICEF. Sales of the album and DVD continue to benefit the George Harrison Fund for UNICEF.

télécharger (7).jpg


 Facebook | | |


Dan Hartman

Today we remember the passing of the great Daniel Earl "Dan" Hartman (December 8, 1950 – March 22, 1994) was an American musician, singer, songwriter and record producer. Among songs he wrote and recorded were "Free Ride" with The Edgar Winter Group, and the solo hits "Instant Replay", "I Can Dream About You", "We Are the Young" and "Second Nature". "I Can Dream About You", his most successful song, reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1984. The James Brown song "Living in America", which Hartman co-wrote and produced, was even more successful, reaching #4 in 1985.
Hartman was born near Pennsylvania's capital, Harrisburg, in West Hanover Township, Dauphin County. He joined his first band, The Legends, at the age of 13. His brother Dave was also a member of the band. He played keyboards and wrote much of the band's music, but despite the release of a number of recordings, none turned out to be hits. He subsequently spent a period of time backing the Johnny Winter Band. He then joined the Edgar Winter Group (Edgar Winter was Johnny Winter's younger brother), where he played bass, wrote or co-wrote many of their songs, and sang on three of their albums. He wrote and sang the band's second biggest pop hit, "Free Ride", in 1972. The ballad "Autumn" on Edgar's LP They Only Come Out at Night was a regional radio hit in New England. Upon launching a solo career in 1976, he released a promotional album titled Who Is Dan Hartman and Why Is Everyone Saying Wonderful Things About Him?. It was a compilation disc including songs from Johnny Winter and the Edgar Winter Group. His second release, Images, was his first true album and featured ex-Edgar Winter Group members Edgar Winter, Ronnie Montrose and Rick Derringer and guests Clarence Clemons and Randy Brecker.
From October 21 until November 5, 1977, blues legend Muddy Waters used Hartman's recording studio in Westport, Connecticut. Hartman ran the recording board for the sessions, produced by Johnny Winter, which created the album I'm Ready.
In late 1978, Hartman reached No. 1 on the Dance Charts with the disco single, "Instant Replay", which crossed over to No. 29 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1979 and also reached the Top 10 on the UK charts. Musicians Hartman worked with on the associated album included Vinnie Vincent and G. E. Smith. This was followed by his second chart topper, 1979's "Relight My Fire", which featured friend Loleatta Holloway on vocals. This song later became the theme for the NBC talk show Tomorrow and in 1993 became a hit single for British boy band Take That featuring Lulu. There was also a cover version of "Instant Replay" recorded by the British duo Yell!, a top 10 hit in January 1990.
He was back on the charts again with the single "I Can Dream About You", which was featured on his album of the same name I Can Dream About You as well as the Streets of Fire soundtrack in 1984. The tune reached No. 6 on the U.S. charts, and (on re-release in 1985) No. 12 in the UK. Hartman was featured as a bartender in one of the two videos that were released for the single, which received heavy rotation on MTV. "I Can Dream About You" is sung within the movie Streets of Fire by a fictional vocal group called The Sorels, whose lead singer is played by Stoney Jackson; the actual vocal was performed by Winston Ford.
In 1984, Hartman also performed "Heart of the Beat" under the band name 3V with Charlie Midnight for the soundtrack of Breakin', directed by Joel Silberg and, in 1985, scored a third Number 1 single on the Dance Music charts, "We Are the Young". The single "Second Nature" also charted during this period. Also in 1985, Hartman's song "Talking To The Wall" was featured on the soundtrack to the film Perfect starring Jamie Lee Curtis and John Travolta.
In 1985 and 1986 Hartman worked on what was planned as his subsequent studio album, White Boy; he wanted the album to have a darker and more mature sound than his previous work. The album was completed in 1986, but the record label, MCA, thought it was too dissimilar to Hartman's previous work, especially "I Can Dream About You", and refused to release it. White Boy was never been released, though some test pressings of the album were made that are now held by collectors, and some of the songs from the album are available on the internet. One song from the album, "Waiting to See You", was used in the 1986 film Ruthless People and its accompanying soundtrack album, and was subsequently released as a single.
In 1988, Hartman co-wrote the song "Why Should I Worry?" with Charlie Midnight, for the Walt Disney Animation Studios film Oliver and Company.
During the next decade he worked as a songwriter and producer, and collaborated with such artists as Tina Turner, Dusty Springfield, Joe Cocker, Bonnie Tyler, Paul Young, James Brown, Nona Hendryx, Holly Johnson, Living in a Box, the Plasmatics and Steve Winwood. Hartman produced and co-wrote "Living in America", a No. 4 hit for James Brown which appeared on the soundtrack of 1985's Rocky IV. The song was the last of Brown's 44 hit recordings to appear on the Billboard Top 40 charts. The track also appeared on the Hartman produced album Gravity.
In 1989 he released his last studio album New Green Clear Blue, an instrumental new age-styled album. In 1991, Hartman recorded "(That's Your) Consciousness" for the soundtrack to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze. In 1994, the album Keep the Fire Burnin' was posthumously released - a compilation featuring remixes of earlier hits and previously unreleased material. The album spawned two singles; "Keep the Fire Burnin'" - a duet featuring Halloway - and "The Love in Your Eyes".
Hartman died at his Westport, Connecticut home of an AIDS-related brain tumor. His remains were cremated. At the time of his death, his music was enjoying a revival of sorts: A cover version of "Relight My Fire" became a British number-one hit for Take That and Lulu. Sales of Hartman's solo recordings, group efforts, production, songwriting and compilation inclusions exceed 50 million records worldwide.


 Facebook | | |

William Keith Relf

William Keith Relf (22 March 1943 – 14 May 1976) was an English musician, best known as the lead vocalist and harmonica player for The Yardbirds.
Relf started playing in bands around the summer of 1956 as a singer, guitarist, and harmonica player. His blues harp was a key part of the Yardbirds' sound and success, according to many, and his vocals may have been as important a contribution to the band, as that of their three lead guitarists Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page—who were augmented by bassist Paul Samwell-Smith, guitarist/bassist Chris Dreja, and drummer Jim McCarty.
Relf co-wrote many of the original Yardbirds songs ("Shapes of Things", "I Ain't Done Wrong", "Over Under Sideways Down", "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago"), later showing a leaning towards acoustic/folk music as the sixties unfolded ("Only the Black Rose"). He also sang an early version of "Dazed and Confused" in live Yardbirds concerts, a song later recorded by the band's successor group Led Zeppelin.
His debut solo single, "Mr. Zero", peaked at No. 50 in the UK Singles Chart in May 1966.
After The Yardbirds broke up in July 1968, Relf formed the acoustic duo Together, with fellow Yardbird Jim McCarty, followed immediately by Renaissance (which also featured his sister Jane Relf). After leaving Renaissance in 1970, he started producing other artists: Steamhammer, folk-rock band Hunter Muskett, the acoustic world music group Amber, psychedelic band Saturnalia, and blues-rock band Medicine Head (with whom he also played bass guitar). In 1974, he formed progressive/rock group Armageddon. Their self-titled debut, Armageddon, was recorded in England and released in the United States on A&M Records. The album's original liner notes used the term "supergroup"; their personnel (besides Relf) included drummer Bobby Caldwell (previously a member of Captain Beyond and Johnny Winter's band), guitarist Martin Pugh (from Steamhammer, The Rod Stewart Album, and later of 7th Order), and bassist Louis Cennamo (also formerly of Renaissance and Steamhammer).
Relf was 33 when he died from electrocution, in the basement of his home, while playing his improperly earthed (electrically grounded) guitar. Relf had dealt with several health issues throughout his life, including emphysema and asthma, which may have contributed to his inability to survive the electric shock. At the time, it is said that Relf was in the process of putting back together the original Renaissance line-up – which would eventually be called Illusion. He was buried in Richmond Cemetery.


 Facebook | | |

Patrick Augustus Olive

Patrick Augustus Olive of the British Classic funk band Hot Chocolate (Grenadian percussionist and bassist, born 22 March 1947 in Grenada).Bass player Patrick Olive co-founded the band in 1968.Olive still sees the band’s music as a mix of all the “best parts of the ‘70s”, with its string of chart-topping hits including You Sexy Thing, Every 1’s A Winner and It Started With A Kiss.
Hot Chocolate started their recording career making a reggae version of John Lennon's "Give Peace a Chance", but frontman Errol Brown was told he needed permission. He was contacted by Apple Records, discovered that Lennon liked his version, and the group was subsequently signed to Apple Records. The link was short-lived as the Beatles were starting to break up; and consequently the Apple connection soon ended.
Later in 1970 Hot Chocolate, with the help of record producer Mickie Most, began releasing tracks that became hits, such as "Love Is Life", "Emma", "You Could Have Been a Lady" (a U.S. and Canadian hit for April Wine), and "I Believe in Love". All those releases were on the Rak record label, owned by Most. Brown and bassist Tony Wilson wrote most of their original material, and also provided hits for Herman's Hermits, "Bet Yer Life I Do", and Mary Hopkin, "Think About Your Children".
Gradually the five-piece Brixton-based outfit started to become UK Singles Chart regulars. "Brother Louie", which featured a guest spoken vocal from Alexis Korner, and "Emma" introduced the act.
In 1992 the band reformed with new vocalist Greg Bannis and keyboardists Steve Ansell, Andy Smith, Willy Dowling, and Steve Matthews (the latter two of which departed the band in 1994), and manager and agent Ric Martin took control over the band's bookings and live appearances. Kennie Simon took over lead vocals in 2010 following the departure of Bannis and Hot Chocolate continue to make live appearances in the UK and Europe.
On 6 May 2015, original frontman and principal songwriter Errol Brown died from liver cancer. He was 71.


 Facebook | | |

Bob Dylan

March 22nd 1965, Bob Dylan released his fifth studio album Bringing It All Back Home. The album was the first of Dylan's albums to break into the US top 10, and it also topped the UK charts later that Spring. The lead-off track, Subterranean Homesick Blues became Dylan's first single to chart in the US, peaking at No.39. The album's iconic cover, photographed by Daniel Kramer, features Sally Grossman, wife of Dylan's manager Albert Grossman, lounging in the background. The artefacts scattered around the room include vinyl LPs by The Impressions and Robert Johnson.


 Facebook | | |

George Benson

March 22nd 1943, Born on this day, George Benson, US singer, jazz /pop singer, guitarist, (1980 US No.4 & UK No.7 single 'Give Me The Night').


 Facebook | | |

Led Zeppelin

March 22nd 1975, Led Zeppelin started a six-week run at No.1 on the US album chart withPhysical Graffiti the group's fourth US No.1 album. On its first day of release in the US, the album shipped a million copies – no other album in the history of Atlantic records had generated so many sales. Physical Graffiti has now been certified 16 times Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for US sales in excess of 16 million copies.

télécharger (5).jpg

 Facebook | | |


22nd March 1984, Queen filmed the video for ‘I Want To Break Free’ at Limehouse Studio in London, England. Directed by David Mallet, it was a parody of the northern British soap opera Coronation Street with the band members dressed in drag. Guitarist Brian May later said the video ruined the band in America, and was initially banned by MTV in the US


 Facebook | | |

Pink Floyd

22nd March 1980, Pink Floyd's 'Another Brick In The Wall (Part 2)' started a four week run at No.1 on the US singles chart. The track, which was the group’s only US chart topper, was also a No.1 in the UK, Germany, Australia, Italy and in many other countries around the world. Pink Floyd received a Grammy nomination for Best Performance by a Rock Duo or Group for the song, but lost to Bob Seger's Against The Wind.

télécharger (6).jpg

 Facebook | | |


Stevie Ray Vaughan

In 1980, Stevie Ray Vaughan saw a guitar in a pawn shop. It was a 1965 maple-neck Fender Stratocaster with a rosewood fingerboard. There was something about it that immediately resonated with him.

But it cost $350. His birthday was coming up and Stevie's wife, Lenora, found 7 friends with $50 and bought him the guitar for his 26th birthday, Oct 3, 1980.

Stevie was so moved, he took the guitar home and as Lenora slept, her husband wrote a new song. In the morning, Lenora remembers, “He was sitting on the edge of the bed with the guitar and said, ‘Listen to this.’” He played her the song he had written that night, “Lenny,” and she cried.

“It was beautiful,” she said. “How can you stop loving anything like that?"

We haven't.


 Facebook | | |

David Bowie

21st March 1976, After a David Bowie concert at the Community War Memorial arena in Rochester, New York, Iggy Pop and David Bowie were involved in a drug bust at their hotel room where the police found 182 grams (a little over 6.4 ounces) of marijuana. The pair spent the rest of the night in the Monroe County Jail and were released at about 7 a.m. on $2,000 bond each.


 Facebook | | |

Bruce Springsteen

March 21st 1994, Bruce Springsteen won an Oscar for the song 'Streets of Philadelphia.'


 Facebook | | |

Ozzy Osbourne

March 21st 2004, Ozzy Osbourne was named the nation's favourite ambassador to welcome aliens to planet earth. The 55-year-old singer came top of a poll as the face people want to represent them to alien life. The poll of internet users was carried out following the discovery of signs of water on Mars. Ozzy won 26 per cent of the vote. A spokesman for Yahoo! News said: "As the world waits desperately for signs of alien life, we decided to ask our users who they thought was best suited for this most auspicious of roles. Ozzy is a great choice but I'm not sure what the Martians would make of his individual approach to the English language."


 Facebook | | |

Roger Hodgson

March 21st 1950, Born on this day, Roger Hodgson, guitar, Supertramp, (1979 US No.6 & UK No.7 single 'The Logical Song')



 Facebook | | |

Leo Fender

21st March 1991, Leo Fender, the inventor of The Telecaster and Stratocaster guitars died from Parkinson's disease. He started mass producing solid body electric guitars in the late 40s and when he sold his guitar company in 1965, sales were in excess of $40 million a year.




 Facebook | | |