Adolfo "Fito" de la Parra

Happy birthday Adolfo "Fito" de la Parra (born 8 February 1946, Mexico City) is a Mexican drummer, best known as a longtime member of Canned Heat.
Fito de la Parra began playing drums professionally from the age of 14. In 1958 he was a member of a Mexican rock band called Los Sparks. Later he played with some of Mexico's most famous rock bands, Los Sinners, Los Hooligans and with Javier Batiz. In 1966 he moved to Los Angeles and became a member of Sotweed Factor and then left them to join Bluesberry Jam. He also backed The Platters, Etta James, The Rivingtons, Mary Wells and the Shirelles. He replaced Canned Heat's original drummer, Frank Cook and played his first gig with the band on 1 December 1967. He joined in time for their second album, Boogie with Canned Heat, and has played on every subsequent album up to present day.
During his 40+ years with Canned Heat, Fito has also played with some of the greatest blues singers of our time including, Big Joe Turner, T-Bone Walker, Albert Collins, and George "Harmonica" Smith. His solid, basic drumming and fantastic solos have led to recording sessions with John Lee Hooker, Memphis Slim, and Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown. Fito has also written a book "LIVING THE BLUES" with his personal story and Canned Heat's, now available on the band's website cannedheatmusic.com



 As "keeper of the flame" he has remained the band leader, rhythmic and spiritual force behind Canned Heat's music for over four decades. He has also produced three DVDs, "Boogie with Canned Heat", "Rock Made in Mexico", and "Fito de la Parra Drum Solos" and countless CDs for Canned Heat and other artists. He became a US citizen in 1984. Fito is an avid motorcyclist and an animal lover, currently living in Ventura county, CA.
In recent years he was the only member of the 1960s Canned Heat line-up that toured with the group, although in 2010 (and for most shows in 2009) Larry Taylor and Harvey Mandel rejoined the group and together with Fito are currently touring worldwide.


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Vincent Neil Wharton

Happy birthday to the rocker Vincent Neil Wharton (born February 8, 1961) an American vocalist and musician, best known as the lead vocalist of heavy metal band Mötley Crüe.
Neil was born in Hollywood, California to Shirley (née Ortiz) and Clois "Odie" Wharton. He has Mexican ancestry on his mother's side and Native American ancestry on his father's. During the 1960s, his family moved around Southern California from Inglewood to Watts, before finally settling in Glendora, attending Sunflower Intermediate School and later Royal Oak High School. As well as having an interest in music while a teenager, Neil was also interested in surfing, basketball, baseball, football and wrestling.
Neil was discovered while performing with his band Rockandi in 1979, and joined Mötley Crüe in 1980. Neil had been friends with Tommy Lee in high school. Mötley Crüe was looking for a lead vocalist at the time and were impressed by Neil after hearing him through Lee. Mötley Crüe released its first album, Too Fast for Love, the same year. In 1983, Mötley Crüe released Shout at the Devil, which established the band as a big act in rock and roll.
In 1985, Neil regrouped with Mötley Crüe to record Theatre of Pain. In 1987, the band recorded the album Girls, Girls, Girls. In 1989, the band released their highest-selling album, Dr. Feelgood.
In February 1992, Mötley Crüe parted ways with Vince Neil. Neil had taken up Indy racing a few years earlier, often turning up at celebrity races. Neil enjoyed the sport so much that he eventually formed Vince Neil Racing. He was racing in the Indy Lights open-wheel developmental series at the time. Neil retired from racing in 1992 after crashing his car during a race in Long Beach after the third lap.
Neil signed a solo deal with Warner Brothers for $4 million. He received a $2 million advance on his first record.
Neil sued Mötley Crüe for 25% of their future profits and $5 million in damages for being fired.
In 1992, Neil released his first single. He stated that the song was written in twenty minutes with his friends Jack Blades and Tommy Shaw. The single "You're Invited (But Your Friend Can't Come)" was featured on the Encino Man soundtrack. Neil made a video for the song that featured a cameo by Pauly Shore. The video does not feature guitarist Steve Stevens as Stevens was hired after the song and video had been released. Stevens re-recorded the song for Neil's first solo album. Neil performed the song live on the MTV Movie Awards.
Exposed, was Neil's first solo album and was released in 1993. The album debuted at #13 on the Billboard charts. The album featured Stevens, who subsequently played all bass and guitar tracks on "Exposed", Dave Marshall, Robbie Crane, and Vik Foxx. The band eventually went on tour, opening for Van Halen.
By 1997, both Neil's solo career and Mötley Crüe's fortunes were declining, so he accepted their invitation to rejoin the band. They released the album Generation Swine, which debuted at #4 on the Billboard charts. Tension soon erupted within the band, however, this time prompting Tommy Lee to leave the band. The other band members replaced him with Randy Castillo and recorded the album New Tattoo in 2000. The renewed band went on hiatus when Castillo died from cancer in 2002.
In late 1984, Finnish hard rock band Hanoi Rocks was on their second American tour and a first one ever to reach California. The two gigs meant to be held in Los Angeles sold out in twenty minutes. On the day they arrived in Los Angeles, December 8, Hanoi Rocks drummer Nicholas "Razzle" Dingley and the other members of the band (with the exception of singer Michael Monroe, who was recovering from a fractured ankle) visited Neil's home and spent the day at Redondo Beach. After partying for hours, Neil and Razzle decided to take a trip to a local liquor store in Neil's De Tomaso Pantera. Neil, who was drunk, lost control of the car and hit an oncoming vehicle. The two occupants of the other car were seriously injured and suffered brain damage, and Dingley was killed. Neil was charged with vehicular manslaughter and driving under the influence of alcohol in connection with the crash. His blood alcohol level was 0.17, well above the California legal limit at that time of 0.10. In July 1986, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Edward Hinz, Jr. sentenced Neil to 30 days in jail, five years probation, $2.6 million in restitution to the victims of the crash and 200 hours of community service. Neil got out of jail in 15 days for good behavior; Mötley Crüe dedicated their third studio album, Theatre of Pain, to Razzle.
Neil was arrested in 2002 for punching record producer Michael Schuman to the ground in a nightclub parking lot. Neil was ordered to pay restitution and complete community service.
In 2003, Neil was arrested again after accusations that he assaulted a sex worker at the Moonlight BunnyRanch by grabbing her around the throat and throwing her against a wall. On April 9, 2004, Neil pled no contest to battery charges and he was sentenced to a 30-day jail suspension, 60 days anger management, and was fined $1,000 plus court fees of $132.
On December 15, 2004, an arrest warrant for misdemeanor assault was issued for Neil after a fight during a show on October 30 where he left a soundman unconscious for 45 minutes. Police had given the singer a criminal-trespass warning before he left the club and headed to Houston for a Halloween show.
In 2007, Neil was arrested for suspicion of DUI in Las Vegas after police spotted him making some erratic moves in his Ferrari. Neil later worked out a deal with prosecutors where he pleaded guilty to reckless driving in exchange for them to drop the DUI charge.
In June 2010, Neil was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving in Las Vegas after having allegedly smashed a fan's camera and was released on $2,000 bond. On January 26, 2011, Neil plead guilty to drunk driving and was sentenced to 15 days in the Clark County jail and 15 days under house arrest.
In March 2011, Neil was charged with battery and disorderly conduct after an altercation with ex-girlfriend, Alicia Jacobs. On May 2, 2011, Neil’s attorneys plead not guilty on his behalf during an arraignment and he was ordered to stay away from Jacobs then was scheduled to appear in court on August 8. On August 8, 2011, Neil’s trial was rescheduled for November 7 due to an unexplained emergency.


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Robin, Maurice and Barry Gibb

February 7th 1967, Robin, Maurice and Barry Gibb of The Bee Gees returned to the UK after living in Australia for nine years.


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Dave Pevertt

February 7th 2000, English guitarist and singer Dave Pevertt died from kidney cancer aged 56. He had been a member of the English blues rock band Savoy Brown and Foghat who had the Seventies hit singles 'My Babe', and 'Slow Ride'.


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Garth Brooks

February 7th 1962, Born on this day, Garth Brooks, US country singer, who had the 1991 US No.1 album 'Ropin' The Wind' which spent 70 weeks on the US chart, and the 1994 UK No.13 single 'The Red Strokes.' Brooks is the biggest selling artist of the 90's with over 60 million sales.


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David Bryan

February 7th 1962, Born on this day, David Bryan, keyboards with Bon Jovi who had the 1987 US No.1 & UK No.4 single 'Livin' On A Prayer'. Bryan is also the writer of the successful Broadway musical Memphis.


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The Who

7th Feb 1969, The Who recorded 'Pinball Wizard' at Morgan Studio's, London, England. The song is one of the band's most famous live songs, being played at almost every Who concert since its debut live performance on 2 May 1969. The track which featured on their 1969 rock opera album Tommy was released as a single in 1969 and reached No. 4 in the UK charts and No. 19 in the US.

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Bob Marley

Nesta Robert Marley (6 February 1945 – 11 May 1981) was a Jamaican singer-songwriter who achieved international fame through a series of crossover reggae albums. Starting out in 1963 with the group the Wailers, he forged a distinctive songwriting and vocal style that would later resonate with audiences worldwide. The Wailers would go on to release some of the earliest reggae records with producer Lee Scratch Perry. After the Wailers disbanded in 1974, Marley pursued a solo career which culminated in the release of the album Exodus in 1977 which established his worldwide reputation.He was a committed Rastafarian who infused his music with a profound sense of spirituality.


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Axl Rose

Happy birthday W. Axl Rose (born William Bruce Rose, Jr.; raised as William Bruce Bailey; February 6, 1962) an American singer-songwriter and musician. He is the lead vocalist of the hard rock band Guns N' Roses, a position he has held since its inception in 1985. Due to his powerful and wide vocal range and energetic live performances, Rose has been named one of the greatest singers of all time by various media outlets, including Rolling Stone and NME.
Born and raised in Lafayette, Indiana, Rose moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s, where he became active in the local hard rock scene and joined several bands, including Hollywood Rose and L.A. Guns. In 1985, he co-founded Guns N' Roses, with whom he had great success and recognition in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Their first album, Appetite for Destruction (1987), has sold in excess of 30 million copies worldwide, and is the best-selling debut album of all time in the U.S. with 18 million units sold. Its full-length follow-ups, the twin albums Use Your Illusion I and Use Your Illusion II (1991), were also widely successful; they respectively debuted at No. 2 and No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and have sold a combined 35 million copies worldwide.
After 1994, following the conclusion of their two-and-a-half-year Use Your Illusion Tour, Rose disappeared from public life for several years, while the band disintegrated due to personal and musical differences. As its sole remaining original member, he was able to continue working under the Guns N' Roses banner because he had legally obtained the band name. In 2001, he resurfaced with a new line-up of Guns N' Roses at Rock in Rio 3, and subsequently played periodic concert tours to promote the long-delayed Chinese Democracy (2008), which undersold the music industry's commercial expectations despite positive reviews upon its release. In 2012, Rose was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Guns N' Roses, though he declined to attend the event and requested exclusion from the HoF.


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Carl Dean Wilson

Today we remember the passing of the great Carl Dean Wilson (December 21, 1946 – February 6, 1998) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, and record producer who co-founded the Beach Boys. He is best remembered as their lead guitarist and as the youngest brother of bandmates Brian and Dennis Wilson.
Carl Dean Wilson was born in Hawthorne, California, the youngest son of Audree Neva (née Korthof) and Murry Gage Wilson. From his pre-teens he practiced harmony vocals under the guidance of his brother Brian, who often sang in the family music room with his mother and brothers. Inspired by country star Spade Cooley, at the age of 12, Carl asked his parents to buy him a guitar, for which he took some lessons. In 1982, Carl remembered from this time: "The kid across the street, David Marks, was taking guitar lessons from John Maus, so I started, too. David and I were about 12 and John was only three years older, but we thought he was a shit-hot guitarist. John and his sister Judy did fraternity gigs together as a duo. Later John moved to England and became one of the Walker Brothers. ... He showed me some fingerpicking techniques and strumming stuff that I still use. When I play a solo, he's still there." While Brian perfected the band's vocal style and keyboard base, Carl's Chuck Berry-esque guitar became an early Beach Boys trademark.While in high school, Carl also studied saxophone.
Influenced by the guitar playing of Chuck Berry and the Ventures, Carl's initial role in the group was that of lead guitarist and backing vocals, but he occasionally performed lead vocals on several of their hits, including "God Only Knows" (1966) and "Good Vibrations" (1967). Unlike other members of the band, he often played alongside the studio musicians employed during the group's critical and commercial peak in the mid 1960s. After Brian began withdrawing from the group, Carl was forced to take a more active production role, and he became the band's musical director on stage from 1965 until his death from lung cancer in 1998.
During the 1980s, he attempted to launch a solo career, releasing the albums Carl Wilson (1981) and Young Blood (1983). Shortly before his death, he recorded material with Gerry Beckley and Robert Lamm, later released for the posthumous album Like a Brother (2000).
In 1988, Carl was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Beach Boys.


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Frankie Laine

Today we remember the passing of the great Frankie Laine (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio, was an American singer, songwriter, and actor whose career spanned 75 years, from his first concerts in 1930 with a marathon dance company to his final performance of "That's My Desire" in 2005. Often billed as "America's Number One Song Stylist", his other nicknames include "Mr. Rhythm", "Old Leather Lungs", and "Mr. Steel Tonsils". His hits included "That's My Desire", "That Lucky Old Sun", "Mule Train", "Cry of the Wild Goose", "A Woman In Love", "Jezebel", "High Noon", "I Believe", "Hey Joe!", "The Kid's Last Fight", "Cool Water", "Moonlight Gambler," "Love Is a Golden Ring," "Rawhide", and "Lord, You Gave Me a Mountain."
Frankie Laine was born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio on March 30, 1913, to Giovanni and Cresenzia LoVecchio (née Salerno) [His actual Cook County, Ill, birth Certificate, No. 14436, was already Americanized at the time of his birth, with his name written as "Frank Lovecchio," his mother as "Anna Salerno," and his father as "John Lovecchio," with the "V" lower case in each instance, except in the "Reported by" section with "John Lo Vecchio <father>" written in.. His parents had emigrated from Monreale, Sicily, to Chicago's Near West Side, in "Little Italy," where his father worked at one time as the personal barber for gangster Al Capone. Laine's family appears to have had several organized crime connections, and young Francesco was living with his grandfather when the latter was killed by rival gangsters.
He sang well-known theme songs for many movie Western soundtracks, including 3:10 To Yuma, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and Blazing Saddles, although he was not a country & western singer. Laine sang an eclectic variety of song styles and genres, stretching from big band crooning to pop, western-themed songs, gospel, rock, folk, jazz, and blues. He did not sing the soundtrack song for High Noon, which was sung by Tex Ritter, but his own version (with somewhat altered lyrics, omitting the name of the antagonist, Frank Miller) was the one that became a bigger hit, nor did he sing the theme to another show he is commonly associated with—Champion the Wonder Horse (sung by Mike Stewart)—but released his own, subsequently more popular, version.
Along with opening the door for many R&B performers, Laine played a significant role in the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s. When Nat King Cole's television show was unable to get a sponsor, Laine crossed the color line, becoming the first white artist to appear as a guest (forgoing his usual salary of $10,000.00 as Cole's show only paid scale). Many other top white singers followed suit, including Tony Bennett and Rosemary Clooney, but Cole's show still could not get enough sponsors to continue.
In the following decade, Laine joined several African American artists who gave a free concert for Martin Luther King's supporters during their Selma to Montgomery marches on Washington, D.C.
Laine, who had a strong appreciation of African American music, went so far as to record at least two songs that have being black as their subject matter, "Shine" and Fats Waller's "Black and Blue". Both were recorded early in his career at Mercury, and helped to contribute to the initial confusion among fans about his race.
Laine died of heart failure on February 6, 2007, at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego. In a prepared statement, Laine's family said, "He will be forever remembered for the beautiful music he brought into this world, his wit and sense of humor, along with the love he shared with so many." A memorial mass was held February 12, at the Immaculata parish church on the campus of the University of San Diego. The following day, his ashes, along with those of his late wife, Nan Grey, were scattered over the Pacific Ocean.
Laine's enduring popularity was illustrated in June 2011, when a TV-advertised compilation called Hits reached No. 16 on the British chart. The accomplishment was achieved nearly 60 years after his debut on the UK chart, 64 years after his first major U.S. hit and four years after his death.


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Today we remember the passing of the great Johann (Hans) Hölzel (German: [ˈjoːhan (hans) ˈhœlt͡sl̩]) (19 February 1957 – 6 February 1998), better known by his stage name Falco, was an Austrian pop and rock musician and rapper.
Falco began to show signs of unusual musical talent very early. As a toddler, he was able to keep time with the drumbeat in songs he heard on the radio. He was given a baby grand piano for his fourth birthday; a year later, his birthday gift was a record player which he used to play music by Elvis Presley, Cliff Richard, and the Beatles. At age five, he auditioned for the Vienna Music Academy, where it was confirmed that he had perfect pitch.
Falco had several international hits, "Rock Me Amadeus", "Der Kommissar", "Vienna Calling", "Jeanny", "The Sound of Musik", "Coming Home (Jeanny Part II, One Year Later)" and posthumously, "Out of the Dark". "Rock Me Amadeus" reached No. 1 on the Billboard charts in 1985, making him the only artist whose principal language was German to score a vocal number-one hit in the United States (Bert Kaempfert reached No. 1 in January 1961 with the instrumental "Wonderland by Night"). According to his estate, he has sold 20 million albums and 15 million singles, which makes him the best selling Austrian singer of all time.
Falco died of severe injuries received on 6 February 1998, 13 days before his 41st birthday, when his Mitsubishi Pajero collided with a bus on the road linking the towns of Villa Montellano and Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic. It was determined that Falco was under the influence of alcohol and cocaine. At the time of Falco's death, he was planning a comeback. He was buried in the Zentralfriedhof (Central Cemetery) in Vienna, Austria.


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Simon Phillips

Happy birthday Simon Phillips (born 6 February 1957) an English jazz, pop and rock drummer and producer, best known for his 22-year stint with Toto.
Phillips first started to play professionally at the age of twelve in his father’s Dixieland band for four years. Phillips was the drummer on the 1976 LP 801 Live with Phil Manzanera and Brian Eno. He is also a prolific session drummer, having played for Jeff Beck, The Who, Judas Priest, Tears for Fears, Mike Oldfield and Gary Moore, among others. He was The Who’s drummer in their 1989 American reunion tour. He has released four of his own solo albums. Phillips joined Toto in 1992 after Jeff Porcaro died during rehearsals for an upcoming tour. On January 26, 2014 Phillips left Toto to focus on his own career.
He was inducted into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 2003.


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Gary Moore

6th Feb 2011, Irish guitarist and singer Gary Moore died in his sleep of a heart attack in his hotel room while on holiday in Estepona, Spain. Moore had been a member of Skid Row, Thin Lizzy, and Colosseum II, before going solo, scoring the 1979 UK No.8 single 'Parisienne Walkways'. Moore's greatest influence in the early days was guitarist Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac, who was a mentor to Moore when performing in Dublin.

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Cory Wells

Cory Wells (born Emil Lewandowski; February 5, 1941 – October 20, 2015) was an American singer, best known as one of the three lead vocalists in the band Three Dog Night.
Wells came from a musical family and began playing in Buffalo, New York-area bands in his teens. His biological father, who was married to someone other than his mother, died when Cory was a small child, leaving his mother to struggle financially until she eventually remarried. She gave Cory her maiden last name although Cory eventually changed his surname to Wells (which is a shortened version of his birth father's last name, Wellsley). His full stage name "Cory Wells" was suggested by The Enemys' first manager, Gene Jacobs who had a son named Cory.
Having survived childhood in a low income, blue collar neighborhood and an even more brutal home environment fueled by an abusive stepfather, this according to manager Joel Cohen's band biography, Three Dog Night And Me, before forming The Enemys, Wells joined the United States Air Force directly out of high school.
Following his military tour of duty, Wells returned to Buffalo and was asked to join a band named the Vibratos. Gene Jacobs, the brother-in-law of the Vibratos guitar player, Mike Lustan, suggested to him that the Vibratos travel to California if they were serious about making it in music. They took his advice and changed the name of the band to "The Enemys." They soon began working the clubs in Los Angeles, San Diego, Las Vegas and Sacramento., and they became the house band at the Whisky a Go Go. They were also featured in the television shows The Beverly Hillbillies, Burke's Law, Riot on Sunset Strip, and the film Harper, with Paul Newman and Shelley Winters. While at the Whisky a Go Go, Cher asked the band to tour with Sonny & Cher. It was on this tour that Wells met Danny Hutton, a former songwriter/performer for Hanna-Barbera Productions who became his future partner in the rock band Three Dog Night. The Enemys had minor hits with recordings of "Hey Joe" and "Sinner Man". Wells moved to Phoenix in 1967 where he formed The Cory Wells Blues Band, whose bass player was future Three Dog Night bass player, Joe Schermetzler (stage name Joe Schermie). In 1968, Wells returned to Hollywood where he "couch-surfed" while Danny Hutton worked to convince him of the feasibility of forming a group with three lead singers and a back-up band.
While in the Air Force, he formed a band of interracial musical performers, inspired by his boyhood love of a similar popular band called The Del-Vikings, who had a national hit with the doo-wop song, "Come Go with Me."
Hutton and Wells formed Three Dog Night in 1968. They found a third lead singer in Chuck Negron, whom Hutton had met at a Hollywood party. Hutton, Wells, and Negron met The Beach Boys' Brian Wilson, and they recorded demos under the name "Redwood" with Wilson as producer. The sessions produced a potential single, "Time to Get Alone," but Beach Boy member Mike Love wanted to save the song for the next Beach Boys album. Having perfected their three-part harmony sound, Wells, Hutton and Negron added a four-piece backing group consisting of guitarist Michael Allsup, organist Jimmy Greenspoon, bassist Joe Schermie, and drummer Floyd Sneed. The group began performing as Three Dog Night in 1968, and became one of the most successful bands of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Wells sang the lead vocal on Three Dog Night's Billboard No. 1 hit song "Mama Told Me (Not to Come)". He said that Randy Newman, who wrote the song, later called him on the phone and said: "I just want to thank you for putting my kids through college." 
Unlike many other rock musicians of the day, Wells managed to abstain from drug and alcohol problems. Also, he didn't squander his earnings on the lavish lifestyles of many other successful rock stars; rather, he chose to live a somewhat more moderate existence. After Three Dog Night broke up in 1976, Wells tried a solo career, recording the album Touch Me for A&M Records in 1978. Wells helped re-launch Three Dog Night in the mid-1980s, recording an EP called "It's a Jungle." A falling out with Negron left Hutton and Wells with the name "Three Dog Night" as an entity, under which they had performed successfully until recently, and the pair (along with original member Mike Allsup) toured regularly each year. Original member Jimmy Greenspoon also toured with Three Dog Night until his diagnosis of metastatic melanoma in late 2014, which led to his death in March 2015.
Wells died suddenly in his sleep on October 20, 2015, in Dunkirk, New York at the age of 74. His family later confirmed he was fighting Multiple myeloma, a form of blood cancer, and apparently died of infection related to it. His survivors include his wife, daughters, five grandchildren and siblings.


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David Denny

Happy birthday David Denny (born February 5, 1948, Berkeley, California) an American rock guitar player who was a founding member of Frumious Bandersnatch, a seminal psychedelic rock band from 1960s San Francisco. Denny was a member of the Steve Miller Band, playing on 1977's Book of Dreams, Greatest Hits 1974-1978 (released in 1978, sold over 13 million copies), and 1993's Wide River. Denny wrote the hit song "The Stake," which was on the Book of Dreams and Greatest Hits 1974-1978 albums. While running a Mission District studio during the late 1980s, Denny contributed his guitar and vocal talents as a founding member of the Bombay Crawlers and played several Bay Area gigs with the swampy, powerful rock ensemble. He later released two solo albums, 1991's Diesel Harmonics and 1997's Louisiana Melody. David Denny and his wife Kathy Peck (Executive Director and Co-founder of H.E.A.R. and former bass player with The Contractions) are artists, songwriters, film score composers, and music publisher owners of Monima Music.


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Andrew "Duff" McKagan

Happy birthday Michael Andrew "Duff" McKagan (born February 5, 1964) an American musician, singer, songwriter and author. He is best known for his twelve-year tenure as the bass guitarist of the hard rock band Guns N' Roses, with whom he achieved worldwide success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. McKagan rejoined the band in 2016, following their induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Towards the end of his first tenure with Guns N' Roses, McKagan released a solo album, Believe in Me (1993), and formed the short-lived supergroup Neurotic Outsiders. Following his departure from Guns N' Roses in 1997, McKagan briefly reunited with his pre-success Seattle punk band 10 Minute Warning, before forming the still-active hard rock band Loaded, in which he performs lead vocals and rhythm guitar. Between 2002 and 2008, he played bass in the supergroup Velvet Revolver with his former Guns N' Roses band mates Slash and Matt Sorum. He briefly performed with Jane's Addiction in 2010 and joined the supergroup Hollywood Vampires in 2016.
In addition to his musical career, McKagan has established himself as a writer. He has written weekly columns on a wide variety of topics for Seattle  Week tv 
A former high school drop-out, he attended Seattle University's Albers School of Business and Economics in the early 2000s, and subsequently founded the wealth management firm Meridian Rock.


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Chris Barron

Happy birthday Chris Barron, singer (born February 5, 1968 (age 49 years), Pearl Harbor, Honolulu County, Hawaii, HI) with American group The Spin Doctors .Born while his father, a Vietnam veteran, was stationed at Pearl Harbor during the divisive war. Barron spent his childhood in the Bronx and Rye, NY, before moving to Australia for over three years. When his family returned to the States, Barron attended the same high school in Princeton, NJ, as members of Blues Traveler. Barron and John Popper were close high school friends; the two shared feelings of being an outsider. Barron felt like he was neither an Australian nor an American at that point -- he was just out there.
While at Princeton High, Barron and Popper would jam together after school. Barron was actually in the first incarnation of Blues Traveler, when it was the Blues Band, but was eventually kicked out. (This may have even been before that first version of the band was even considered a band.) Barron has often described Princeton as "the wall that we were all banging our heads against." In his youth, he was quoted as saying that he wouldn't care if the whole town burned down, except for a famous sandwich shop called Hoagie Heaven. His feelings changed in adulthood, but Barron's youth was defined by a certain amount of soul-searching.
Barron attended Bennington College in Vermont for only a year. There, he was a member of two local bands: Dead Alcoholics With Boners and the Funbunnies. After leaving Bennington, Barron returned to Princeton, got a job at a restaurant, and immersed himself in music. It was during this time that he wrote the songs "Jimmy Olsen's Blues" and "Two Princes." One night, Blues Traveler was in town and, after hanging out for night and hearing his songs, invited Barron to move in with them in New York City. 
Up for Grabs...Live New York City is where Barron met the future members of the Spin Doctors: Mark White, Aaron Comess, and Eric Schenkman. The band released Up for Grabs and Pocket Full of Kryptonite in 1991, but the latter took nearly a year to break through. When it did, the band was embraced by MTV, mainstream radio, and Apple Computers, who sponsored their biggest headlining tour; a Grammy nomination followed. The band never had a successful follow-up to the multi-platinum album, due in large part to personality conflicts. Guitarist Eric Schenkman left the band before the release of Turn It Upside Down, and was barely part of the odds-and-ends CD, though he is credited on many of the songs. In fact, the first album with all-new material was 1996's You've Got to Believe in Something, which came out a full five years after their debut. Mark White would also quit the band, leaving only two original members as part of the group.
Chris Barron's legacy is significant. He has a Grammy nomination, a Rolling Stone cover, and two Top Ten hits -- "Little Miss Can't Be Wrong" and "Two Princes" -- for which he won a BMI award. While now considered a one-hit wonder, the Spin Doctors were one of the most popular and ubiquitous bands of the early-'90s rock scene.
In 1999, doctors believed that Barron would never sing again because of a rare vocal chord paralysis. He defied the odds, however, with a full recovery. Following intense treatment and training, his voice remained stronger than ever. A solo album called Shag was released in 2001. The mature album includes diverse influences, including rock, jazz, country, and funk.


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Hal Blaine

5th February 1929, Born on this day, Hal Blaine, American drummer and session musician. He is most known for his work with the Wrecking Crew in California. Blaine played on numerous hits by Elvis Presley, John Denver, the Ronettes, Simon and Garfunkel, the Carpenters, The Beach Boys, Nancy Sinatra, and the 5th Dimension. Blaine has played on 50 No.1 hits, over 150 top ten hits and has recorded, by his own admission, on over 35,000 pieces of music over four decades of work.


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J.R. Cobb

February 5th 1944, Born on this day, J.R. Cobb, from Atlanta Rhythm Section who had the 1979 UK No.48 single 'Spooky'.


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