11/02/2018

Sheryl Suzanne Crow

Happy birthday Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962)....an American singer, songwriter and actress. Her music incorporates elements of pop, rock, folk, country and blues. She has released eight studio albums, two compilations, a live album and has contributed to a number of film soundtracks. She has sold more than 17 million albums in the U.S. and over 50 million albums worldwide. Crow has garnered nine Grammy Awards (out of 32 nominations) from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.
In addition to her own work, Crow has performed with the Rolling Stones, Stevie Nicks, Michael Jackson, Steve Earle, Prince, Eric Clapton, Luciano Pavarotti, Willie Nelson, Smokey Robinson, B.B. King, George Strait, Tony Bennett, Kid Rock and Sting, among others. She has also performed backing vocals for Tina Turner, Don Henley, Stevie Nicks, Belinda Carlisle and Bob Dylan.
Sheryl Suzanne Crow was born in Kennett, Missouri, the daughter of Bernice (née Cain), a piano teacher, and Wendell Wyatt Crow, a lawyer and trumpet player. Her great-grandfather was congressman Charles A. Crow (1873–1938). She has two older sisters named Kathy and Karen and a younger brother named Steven.
While studying at Kennett High School, Crow was a majorette and an all-state track athlete, medaling in the 75-meter low hurdles. She also joined the 'pep club', the National Honor Society, and the National FFA Organization, and was crowned Paperdoll Queen in her senior year. She then enrolled at the University of Missouri in Columbia and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in music composition, performance, and education. While at the university, she sang in the local band Cashmere. She was a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity for Women, and the Omicron Delta Kappa Society as well as working as a 'Summer Welcome' orientation leader. Crow was later awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Missouri and Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
Crow has stated that her musical inspirations are not restricted to one genre—she likes anything with a drum beat. In 2008, she told Ellen DeGeneres that "If it didn't have a drum beat, you can just forget about it!"
As an actress, Crow has appeared on various television shows including 30 Rock, GCB, Cougar Town, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear, as well as One Tree Hill.

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Vincent Eugene Craddock

Vincent Eugene Craddock (February 11, 1935 – October 12, 1971), known as Gene Vincent, was an American musician who pioneered the styles of rock and roll and rockabilly. His 1956 top ten hit with his Blue Caps, "Be-Bop-A-Lula", is considered a significant early example of rockabilly. He is a member of both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.
Vincent Eugene Craddock was born in Norfolk, Virginia. His musical influences included country, rhythm and blues and gospel music. He showed his first real interest in music while his family lived in Munden Point, Princess Anne County (now Virginia Beach), Virginia, near the North Carolina line, where they ran a country store. He received his first guitar at the age of twelve as a gift from a friend.
His father, Ezekiah Jackson Craddock, volunteered to serve in the U.S. Coast Guard and patrolled American coastal waters to protect Allied shipping against German U-boats during World War II. His mother, Mary Louise Craddock, maintained a general store at Munden Point. Craddock's parents moved the family and opened a general store and sailors' tailoring shop in Norfolk.
Having spent his youth in the Norfolk area, Craddock dropped out of school at seventeen and enlisted in the United States Navy in 1952. Craddock's parents signed the forms allowing him to join the Navy. He completed boot camp and joined the fleet as a crewman aboard the fleet oiler USS Chukawan although he spent two weeks training period in the repair ship USS Amphion before returning to the Chukawan. Craddock never saw combat but completed a Korean War deployment. He sailed home from Korean waters aboard battleship USS Wisconsin, but was not part of the ship's company.
Craddock planned a career in the Navy and, in 1955, used his $612 re-enlistment bonus to buy a new Triumph motorbike. In July 1955, while in Norfolk, a motorcycle crash shattered his left leg. He refused to have it amputated. The leg was saved, but the crash left him with a limp and pain. He wore a steel sheath around the leg for the rest of his life. Most accounts relate the accident as the fault of a drunk driver who struck him, although some claim Craddock had been riding drunk. Years later in some of his professional music bios, there is no mention of an accident, but it was claimed that he was wounded in combat in Korea. He spent time in the Portsmouth Naval Hospital and was medically discharged from the Navy shortly thereafter.
Craddock became involved in the local music scene in Norfolk. He changed his name to Gene Vincent, and formed a rockabilly band called the Blue Caps (a term used in reference to enlisted sailors in the U.S. Navy). The band included Willie Williams on rhythm guitar, Jack Neal on upright bass, Dickie Harrell on drums, and lead guitarist, Cliff Gallup. He and his band were named Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps. He also collaborated with another rising musician, Jay Chevalier of Rapides Parish, Louisiana.
Vincent died on October 12, 1971 from a ruptured stomach ulcer while visiting his father in California, and is interred in the Eternal Valley Memorial Park, Newhall, California.
He was the first inductee into the Rockabilly Hall of Fame upon its formation in 1997. The following year he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Vincent has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1749 N. Vine Street. In 2012, his band, the Blue Caps, were retroactively inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by a special committee, alongside Vincent. On Tuesday, September 23, 2003 Vincent was honored with a Norfolk's Legends of Music Walk of Fame bronze star embedded in the Granby Street sidewalk

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Estelle Bennett

Today we remember the passing of the great member of the great 60s girl group the Ronettes Estelle Bennett (July 22, 1941 – February 11, 2009) a member of the girl group The Ronettes, along with her sister Ronnie Spector (the 'Ronnie' of the band's name) and cousin Nedra Talley.
Estelle and her sister, Veronica, grew up New York. Children of a white father and black mother, were reported to have been bullied at school, because of their mixed race appearance.
She attended (George Washington High School in Manhattan where she was valedictorian. Known as studious and interested in fashion she went on to study at Manhattan's Fashion Institute of Technology.
The first incarnation of what was to become the Ronettes appeared in when Estelle was 14.
After a number of unsuccessful attempts the trio reinvented themselves as the Ronette. Signed up by a then 23 year old Phil Spector, Ronnie was made lead, with Estelle and Nedra as backing .
She was frequently romantically associated with a number of contemporary singers including Mick Jagger, George Harrison, Johnny Mathis and George Hamilton.
After the Ronettes' 1966 break-up, she recorded a single for Laurie Records, "The Year 2000/The Naked Boy." She then quit the music business and had rarely been seen since. She married the group's road manager Joe Dong, and they had a daughter, Toyin.
Her mental health deteriorated in the following years. It was reported that, during a visit to fellow former Ronette, Nedra, she slept through her baby daughter crying. She was reported to have had periods of homelessness when she would approach strangers in the street of New York, telling people that she would be singing with the Ronettes in a jazz club.
In 2007, when the group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, it was decided that she was too fragile to perform with them, and spoke only a brief two sentences during her acceptance speech, "I would just like to say, thank you very much for giving us this award. I'm Estelle of the Ronettes, thank you." She did, however, come back out on stage for a final bow with the rest of the Ronettes after the performance of "Be My Baby".
Bennett died of colon cancer aged 67 in Englewood, New Jersey. Her body was discovered on February 11, 2009. A week after her death it was revealed that she had suffered from anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia in the years after the Ronettes break up and that later on she had been homeless in New York.

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Phillip Walker

Phillip Walker (February 11, 1937 – July 22, 2010) an American electric blues guitarist, most noted for his 1959 hit single, "Hello My Darling", produced by J. R. Fulbright. Although Walker continued playing throughout his life, he recorded more sparsely.
Walker grew up in Texas and learned to play guitar in his teens in Houston. He worked with Lonesome Sundown and Lonnie Brooks, and briefly joined Clifton Chenier's band in the 1950s. By the 1960s he was in a R&B band in Los Angeles with his wife Ina, who used the stage name Bea Bopp. His album Bottom of the Top was released by Playboy in 1973. Further albums were released on Black Top, Hightone, JSP, Joliet, and Rounder Records.
Walker was also known for his variety of styles and the changes he would often make for each album. Not until 1969 did he begin to record more regularly when he joined with producer Bruce Bromberg. Since then, fans had a more steady supply of Walker's music.
He appeared on show 237 of the WoodSongs Old-Time Radio Hour in 2002 when Live at Biscuits & Blues had just been released.
Walker's final studio release is Going Back Home (2007) on Delta Groove Productions.
On July 22, 2010, Delta Groove Productions issued an email statement regarding Walker's death: "It is with deepest sorrow that we report on the sudden and unexpected passing of legendary blues guitarist Phillip Walker. He died of apparent heart failure at 4:30 AM, early Thursday morning, July 22, 2010. He was 73 years old."

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Joshua Daniel White

Joshua Daniel White (February 11, 1914 – September 5, 1969), known as Josh White, was an American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. He also recorded under the names "Pinewood Tom" and "Tippy Barton" in the 1930s.
White grew up in the Jim Crow South. During the 1920s and 1930s, he became a prominent race records artist, with a prolific output of recordings in genres including Piedmont blues, country blues, gospel, and social protest songs. In 1931, White moved to New York, and within a decade his fame had spread widely; his repertoire expanded to include urban blues, jazz, traditional folk songs, and political protest songs. He soon was in demand as an actor on radio, Broadway, and film.
White also became the closest African-American friend and confidant to president Franklin D. Roosevelt. However, White's anti-segregationist and international human rights political stance presented in many of his recordings and in his speeches at rallies resulted in the McCarthyites assuming him to be a Communist. Accordingly, from 1947 through the mid-1960s, White became caught up in the anti-Communist Red Scare, and combined with the resulting attempt to clear his name, his career was damaged.
White's musical style influenced many future generations of musical artists, including, Brownie McGhee, Pete Seeger, Lena Horne, Dorothy Dandridge, Nat King Cole, Harry Belafonte, Lonnie Donegan, Eartha Kitt, Alexis Korner, Odetta, Elvis Presley, Tracy Chapman, Joan Armatrading, The Kingston Trio, the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, Merle Travis, Dave Van Ronk, Peter, Paul and Mary, Bob Dylan, Eric Weissberg, Judy Collins, Mike Bloomfield, Danny Kalb, Roger McGuinn, David Crosby, Richie Havens, Don McLean, Roy Harper, Ry Cooder, John Fogerty, Eva Cassidy and Jack White.
White was one of four children born to Reverend Dennis and Daisy Elizabeth White, on February 2, 1914, in the black section of Greenville, South Carolina, United States. His father told him that he was named after the Biblical character Joshua of the Old Testament. His mother introduced him to music at five years old, when he began singing in his local church's choir. White's father threw a white bill collector out of his home in 1921, causing him to be beaten so badly that he very nearly died, and then was locked up in an mental institution, where he died nine years later.
In 1961, White's health began a sharp decline as he experienced the first of the three heart attacks and the progressive heart disease that would plague him over his final eight years. As a lifelong smoker he also had progressive emphysema, in addition to ulcers, and severe psoriasis in his hands and calcium deficiency in his body that would cause the skin to peel off of his fingers and leave his fingernails broken and bleeding with every concert. During the last two years of his life, as his heart weakened dramatically, his wife Carol would put him in the hospital for four weeks after he completed each two-week concert tour. Finally, the doctors felt his only survival option was to attempt a new procedure to replace heart valves. The surgery failed.
He died on the operating table on September 5, 1969 at the North Shore Hospital in Manhasset, New York.
When Associated Press interviewed Harry Belafonte, upon learning of White's passing, he said, "I can't tell you how sad I am. I spent many, many hours with him in the years of my early development. He had a profound influence on my style. At the time I came along, he was the only popular black folk singer, and through his artistry exposed America to a wealth of material about the life and conditions of black people that had not been sung by any other artist."

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Sergio Mendes

February 11th 1941, Born on this day, Sergio Mendes, Brazilian singer, who had the 1983 US No.4 & UK No.45 single 'Never Got Let You Go'.

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The Beatles

February 11th 1963, In less than ten hours, The Beatles record ten new songs for their first album plus four other tracks which would be the next two singles. John Lennon's vocal on The Isley Brothers 'Twist & Shout' was recorded in one take to complete the album.

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Led Zeppelin

February 11th 1972, Led Zeppelin scored their third US Top 20 hit single with 'Black Dog / Misty Mountain Hop', peaking at No.15, and taken from their fourth album. The song's title is a reference to a nameless black Labrador retriever that wandered around the Headley Grange studios during recording. Robert Plant recorded his vocal for the track in two takes.

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David Bowie

11th Feb 1977, David Bowie released 'Sound and Vision' as a single, which was taken from his latest album Low. 'Sound and Vision' was used by the BBC in the UK on trailers at the time, providing considerable exposure, much needed as Bowie opted to do nothing to promote the single himself, and helped the song to No.3 on the UK charts.

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10/02/2018

Don Lee Wilson

Happy birthday Don Lee Wilson.....who was born in Tacoma, Washington on February 10, 1933. The family heritage is mixed -- his mother, Josie, was first generation Swedish, while his father was of Welsh and Irish extraction. Don's early interest in music started with the big band sound and country and western music. When he was about 12 years old, his mother showed him a few chords on the tipple (a 10-stringed instrument, tuned like a ukelele) which she knew how to play. When compared with a guitar, the tipple would be equivalent to a 12-string. Don always liked listening to the GIenn Miller Orchestra, but his idol was Tommy Dorsey because he enjoyed his mellow trombone sound. This inspired Don to take trombone lessons. Don even played when he went into the Army -- in the 169th Infantry, he played with the regimental band in Germany, where he was stationed for 19 months. During this time, he had an army buddy who had previously played guitar, from whom Don learned some more guitar chords. On his return home from the army, Don went to work as a car salesman and, after meeting Bob Bogle, to whom he sold a car, they found they had a mutual interest in playing guitar, even though they only knew a few chords between them. After advancing their knowledge of chords and basic guitar playing, they bought two new Fender guitars and began playing club dates at night, while continuing to work during the day. With the help of Don's mother, Don and Bob made a recording on their own record label, Blue Horizon, which was released locally in the Seattle/Tacoma area. They had heard a song called Walk, Don't Run played by Chet Atkins and, using their own arrangement, they came up with the basis for what was later identified as The Ventures' sound. The tune started to get air play, and was then picked up for nationwide release by Dolton Records. Shortly thereafter, Walk Don't Run became the #2 record in the country, selling over 2 million copies worldwide. The Ventures were on their way to becoming the world's largest selling instrumental group of all time. Their popularity in Japan was such that, during the Beatles heydey in the 60s, The Ventures outsold them two-to-one.

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Roberta Cleopatra Flack

Happy birthday Roberta Cleopatra Flack (born February 10, 1939 an American singer and musician. She is best known for her classic #1 singles "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face", "Killing Me Softly with His Song" and "Feel Like Makin' Love", and for "Where Is the Love" and "The Closer I Get to You", two of her many duets with Donny Hathaway.
Flack lived with a musical family, born in Black Mountain, North Carolina to parents Laron LeRoy (October 11, 1911 – July 12, 1959) and Irene Flack (September 28, 1911 – January 17, 1981) a church organist, on February 10 of either 1937 or 1939 (sources differ) and raised in Arlington, Virginia. She first discovered the work of African American musical artists when she heard Mahalia Jackson and Sam Cooke sing in a predominantly African-American Baptist church.
When Flack was 9, she started taking an interest in playing the piano, and during her early teens, Flack so excelled at classical piano that Howard University awarded her a full music scholarship. By age 15, she entered Howard University, making her one of the youngest students ever to enroll there. She eventually changed her major from piano to voice, and became an assistant conductor of the university choir. Her direction of a production of Aida received a standing ovation from the Howard University faculty. Flack is a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority and was made an honorary member of Tau Beta Sigma by the Eta Delta Chapter at Howard University for her outstanding work in promoting music education.
Roberta Flack became a student teacher at a school near Chevy Chase, Maryland. She graduated from Howard University at 19 and began graduate studies in music, but the sudden death of her father forced her to take a job teaching music and English for $2800 a year in Farmville, North Carolina.
Before becoming a professional singer-songwriter, Flack returned to Washington, D.C. and taught at Browne Junior High and Rabaut Junior High. She also taught private piano lessons out of her home on Euclid St. NW. During this period, her music career began to take shape on evenings and weekends in Washington, D.C. area night spots. At the Tivoli Club, she accompanied opera singers at the piano. During intermissions, she would sing blues, folk, and pop standards in a back room, accompanying herself on the piano. Later, she performed several nights a week at the 1520 Club, again providing her own piano accompaniment. Around this time, her voice teacher, Frederick "Wilkie" Wilkerson, told her that he saw a brighter future for her in pop music than in the classics. She modified her repertoire accordingly and her reputation spread.
In 1999, a star with Flack's name was placed on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. That same year, she gave a concert tour in South Africa; the final performance was attended by President Nelson Mandela. In 2010, she appeared on the 52nd Annual Grammy Awards, singing a duet of "Where Is The Love" with Maxwell.
Flack was the first to win the Grammy Award for Record of the Year two consecutive times. "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" won at the 1973 Grammys and "Killing Me Softly with His Song" won at the 1974 Grammys. She remains the only solo artist to have accomplished this feat, and only U2, who did it in 2001 with "Beautiful Day" and in 2002 with "Walk On", has done it since.

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Cliff Burton

Clifford Lee "Cliff" Burton (February 10, 1962 – September 27, 1986) was an American musician, best known as the bass guitarist for the American thrash metal band Metallica.
Burton joined Metallica in 1982 and performed on the band's first three studio albums: Kill 'Em All, Ride the Lightning and Master of Puppets. He also received a posthumous writing credit for the song "To Live Is to Die" from the band's fourth studio album, ...And Justice for All.
On September 27, 1986, Burton was killed in a bus accident in Kronoberg County, a rural area of southern Sweden, as the band was touring in support of the Master of Puppets album. Cliff was replaced by bassist Jason Newsted in 1986. He was also posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with Metallica on April 4, 2009. He was selected as the ninth greatest bassist of all time in an online reader poll organized by Rolling Stone magazine in 2011.

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The Four Tops

10th Feb 1968, The Four Tops 'Greatest Hits' was at No.1 on the UK album chart, the first No.1 album for the Tamla Motown label.

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Carole King

10th Feb 1971, American singer-songwriter Carole King released her second studio album Tapestry. It is one of the best-selling albums of all time, with over 25 million copies sold worldwide. The lead single from the album 'It's Too Late'/'I Feel the Earth Move' spent five weeks at No.1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The cover photograph was taken at King's Laurel Canyon home. It shows her sitting in a window frame, holding a tapestry she hand-stitched herself, with her cat Telemachus at her feet.

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Elton John

10th Feb 1973, Elton John had his first UK No.1 album when 'Don't Shoot Me I'm Only The Piano Player' started a six-week run at the top of the charts.

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Bob Marley

10th Feb 1966, Bob Marley married Rita Anderson a singer in the group The Soulettes. The couple had three children together.

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The Beatles

10th Feb 1967, The Beatles recorded the orchestral build-up for the middle and end of 'A Day in the Life'. At the Beatles' request, the orchestra members arrived in full evening dress along with novelty items. One violinist wore a red clown's nose, while another, a fake gorilla's paw on his bow hand. Others were wearing funny hats and other assorted novelties. The recording was filmed for a possible 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band' television special which was ultimately abandoned. Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Mike Nesmith from The Monkees and Donovan also attended the session.

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David Bowie

February 10th 1972, David Bowie appeared at the Tolworth Toby Jug, London, on the opening date of his Ziggy Stardust tour. The character of Ziggy was initially inspired by British rock 'n' roll singer Vince Taylor.

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09/02/2018

FOGHAT Bassist CRAIG MACGREGOR Dies At 68

FOGHAT bassist Craig MacGregor died earlier today (Friday, February 9) after a long battle with lung cancer. He was 68 years old.

"On behalf of Craig MacGregor's family and the FOGHAT family, it is with great sadness that we are letting you know that we have lost our brother, good friend, husband, father and bandmate this morning," the band wrote on Facebook. "He passed peacefully in his wife Lisa MacGregor's arms after a prolonged battle with cancer. Please respect the privacy of the family and band members at this time. We will be sharing information in the next day or so. Rest in peace, Thunderfingers."

MacGregor, who joined FOGHAT in 1975, stopped performing with the band after being diagnosed with lung cancer in 2015, but remained an official member until his death. He underwent aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments but was no longer able to play because his fingers had become "clubbed," a deformation related to his illness.

"Oh my gosh, this has been devastating," Lisa MacGregor told The Morning Call in a 2016 interview. "Music is all he's done. It's his passion. It's his second family… It has been very hard for him."

FOGHAT released its debut album in 1971 and immediately hit the charts with "I Just Want To Make Love To You". The band gained momentum throughout the decade, releasing several hit albums, including 1977's double platinum "Foghat Live".

FOGHAT's current touring lineup consists of Roger Earl on drums, Charlie Huhn on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Bryan Bassett on lead guitar and Rodney O'Quinn on bass.

The band is celebrating the 40th anniversary of its 1978 album "Stone Blue".

FOGHAT's most recent release was 2016's "Under The Influence".

Two original members of FOGHAT passed away in the last two decades: singer/guitarist Lonesome Dave Peverett in 2000, and original lead guitarist Rod Price in 2005.

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Bill Haley

February 9th 1981, American singer Bill Haley was found dead, fully clothed on his bed at his home in Harlingen, Texas from a heart attack, Haley had sold over 60 million records during his career. Scored the 1955 UK & US No.1 single 'Rock Around the Clock' and became known as the first Rock 'n' Roll star. Haley was blinded in his left eye as a child due to a botched operation and later adopted his distinctive spit-curl hairstyle to distract attention from his blind eye.

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